Daniel Burton lives in Salt Lake County, Utah, where he practices law by day and everything else by night. He reads about history, politics, and current events, as well as more serious genres such as science fiction and fantasy. You can also follow him on his blog PubliusOnline.com where he muses on politics, the law, books and ideas.

About Daniel

Daniel Burton lives in Salt Lake County, Utah, where he practices law by day and everything else by night. He reads about history, politics, and current events, as well as more serious genres such as science fiction and fantasy. You can also follow him on his blog PubliusOnline.com where he muses on politics, the law, books and ideas.

Book Thoughts | Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

I finished reading Of Mice and Men last night. Its very short length belies the emotional impact of Steinbeck’s obliquely named novella. Though I had read it before, some twenty odd years ago, I found myself hazy on the details, and I decided to read it again. And I think I may read it yet […]

2017 Reading Stats in Review

I read a few books in 2017. Here’s a breakdown of stats, followed by some lists of my favorite books this year: 72 total books/graphic novels/audiobooks. 64 different authors. 30 books in 22 different series, 13 which were the first book in the series, 5 were the second, 2 were the third, and 8 were […]

Review | The Collapsing Empire (The Interdependency #1) by John Scalzi

Meh. A big fat ‘meh’ is all I can muster for Scalzi’s latest, The Collapsing Empire. There’s potential here, interesting concepts and creative ideas, and even some clever plot twists. And yet, it feels like Scalzi is mailing it in. Due to a discovery of the Flow, humanity has managed to overcome the light speed […]

Review | Time Travel: A History by James Gleick

A few years ago, I read a book called Debt: The First 5,000 Years. Written by David Graeber, an anthropologist, and anarchist (I’m not sure how one teaches at the London School of Economics and calls themselves an anarchist, but what do I know?), it was less about economics and more about anthropology. It described […]

Short Review | A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles

As titles go, A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles is about as much of an understatement as it gets. And yet, it is one of the most surprisingly fulfilling reads of my year. During the Russian Revolution, Count Alexander Rostov finds himself an aristocrat in a world where only the proletariat is legal. By […]

DNF | Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons

As part of this year’s UK Reading Challenge, I tried to read Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons. It’s a satire about 19-year old orphan Flora Poste who decides to go live with her distant relatives (or something) instead of getting a job and becoming a productive member of society. She DOES have a one […]

Short Review | Grit by Angela Duckworth

I think one of the best measures of a book is how long after you read it you find yourself talking about it, thinking about it, and recommending it to others. One that recently intrigued me was Grit by Angela Duckworth. It sat on my shelf in my TBR pile for months after I received […]

Dunkirk? Speaking of WW II history, here are a few recommendations…

(Recommendations at the bottom. If you have a favorite you don’t see listed, post it in the comments.) Known as “Operation Dynamo,” the evacuation at Dunkirk began on May 26, 1940, saving 338,000 Allied troops from the German juggernaut. On June 4, Prime Minister Winston Churchill took to the floor of the House of Commons […]

Harry Potter’s 20th Birthday: On magic, youth, and reading the series to my kids

There’s nothing quite like rediscovering Harry Potter through the eyes of children. Like most readers of my generation, I enjoyed the books of the Harry Potter series as they were released (mostly, at least…I missed the first couple while on my mission). I read the Sorcerer’s Stone over a Christmas break during college when I […]

Book Review | All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

I think I must be the last person I know to read All the Light We Cannot See, and I admit I’m kicking myself that I took so long. It’s easily one of the most moving books I’ve read in recent memory. That said, I feel like it was also one of the most effortlessly […]